Turkey's Tekel workers take break from strike after court victory

Printervriendelijke versieSend by email

The workers have been on strike for more than two months to protest the privatization of the former state-owned alcohol and tobacco monopoly, or Tekel.

 

Striking Tekel workers in Turkey will take a 15 to 20 day break and clear their tents from in front of Turkey's ruling party's headquarters in response to a court decision that has given them renewed hope.

The workers have been on strike for more than two months to protest the privatization of the former state-owned alcohol and tobacco monopoly, or Tekel.

The move to temporarily stop the strike comes after a decision by the Council of State to extend the Tekel workers’ grace period before transferring them to 4/C status, which requires them to find new work within 30 days.

Tobacco, Drink, Food and Allied Workers' Union, or Tek-Gıda İş, President Mustafa Türkel emphasized on Tuesday that the break does not mean that the strike is over.

“A new phase begins in the struggle for Tekel," Türkel said on Monday, according to the Anatolia news agency. "We did not accept 4/C and we will not accept 4/C.”

Türkel said the workers would also clear the tents in front of the ruling Justice and Development Party, or AKP, government in Ankara, by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Türkel said the workers would take a 15 to 20 day break from striking.

The Council of State temporarily stalled a Cabinet decision that required former Tekel workers to find new work within 30 days. According to Article 4/C, workers maintain the status of public employees but with lower wages and fewer employee rights. Coming on the eve of the grace period’s expiration date, the court’s move is seen as a victory for the workers.

Tekel workers officially became unemployed on Jan. 31 after the government closed the state-owned Tekel units that were not privatized under a controversial new law regulating public employees’ working conditions.

Tekel workers will also continue to receive their severance pay.

 

ISTANBUL — Daily News
 

 

More About Us

       

 
 
Inhoud syndiceren